“Heal the Broken – Hearted”

“Healing” is the central them for today’s Mass (5th Sunday of Ordinary Time, year B). This healing can be either physical (as in Mark’s Gospel, where Jesus heals Simon’s mother – in- law, among others, or it can be emotional and spiritual, as clearly expressed in the response to the psalm:

Praise the Lord who heals the broken-hearted.

For LGBT Christians, it is this spiritual healing that will have particular relevance. Just like everybody else, we too will have need for physical healing at different times and to varying degrees, but will also have a particular need to be healed from the hurt and pain unnecessarily inflicted on us by some elements of Church teaching, and by some other Christians, in defiance of the clear Gospel message of inclusion and love for all. When we feel hurt in this way, we need to remember that while some people may reject us, God will never do so. When we turn to Him,  Christ will indeed “heal the broken- hearted”  – and we can receive that healing either by turning to the texts of the Bible (especially the Gospels), which really are “Good news”, as Paul says, or even better, by applying direct, in prayer

There is more to the day’s reading though, than just the reminder of God’s healing for us. There is also an implicit command to take that message, and offer it to others, so that they too may be healed. In his letter to the Corinthians, Paul stresses that preaching the gospel is “a duty which has been laid on me”. That duty however is shared by us all, as Pope Frnncis spelled out in “Evangelii Gaudium”.

First reading: Job 7:1-4,6-7

Psalm: 146:1-6

Second reading: 1 Corinthians 9:16-19,22-23

Gospel Acclamation: Jn8:12 or Mt8:17

Gospel: Mark 1:29-39

Bondings 2.0: “Patiently Waiting for the Desert to Bloom With Abundant Flowers” (3rd of Advent)

Pope Francis writes that, after we perform a recollected reading of the text, we ask ourselves some questions about the Scripture passage. What does this text say to me? What about my life needs to change? What do I find pleasant or attractive in this text for my life? Francis says that we need to avoid the temptation to apply the passage to other people. Now, this hits home! During the Scripture readings at Sunday worship service, I sometimes find myself thinking, “I hope so-and-so heard that!”

With Francis’ advice at hand, I read and reread the Scripture texts for the Third Sunday of Advent to figure out what God was saying to me. Isaiah speaks of a joyful time when all will be made right and good: feeble hands and weak knees will be strengthened, blind eyes will be opened, and deaf ears will hear. But until this time arrives, the epistle of James cautions us to be patient, just as the farmer waits for the rains to water the precious fruit of the earth. We are not to complain about one another, but look to the prophets as examples of the patience God asks of us.

The Gospel reading gives us an example in the prophet, John the Baptist. John preached a stirring message of repentance for sin and baptism with water to cleanse the body and soul, but John waited patiently for a Messianic figure, who would baptize with the Holy Spirit. From his prison cell, John sends his disciples to ask Jesus if his waiting time is over. “Are you the one who is to come, or should we look for another?” John is an example of patience.

via Patiently Waiting for the Desert to Bloom With Abundant Flowers | Bondings 2.0.

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“The Lord is Kind, and Full of Compassion”

“The Lord is Kind, and Full of Compassion”: “I found particular resonance in this Psalm for today, in the light of Jonah’s introductory post here yesterday. He described first how he had once resisted the call to priesthood, and later the need to recognize his orientation and come out as a gay man. In both cases, he wrote, the Lord pursued him – and he later found that on both counts, God was right. Coming to terms with what he saw as God’s insistence that he be both priest and gay, Jonah recognized the absolute truth of the words above – although he expressed this not in the words of the psalm, but in a quotation from Thomas Merton, ”mercy within mercy within mercy”, which Jonah goes on to describe as “relentless” mercy, which heals all wounds.”

‘via Blog this’